Louisville jail uses new body scanner to stop illegal drugs

0

THREE SECONDS AND IN THIS TEIM, THE SNNCAER CLEARPASS PROVIDES LMDC STAFF WITH A CLEAR PICTURE AND NOT JUST WHO WAS ENTERING THE PRISON. TBU WHAT NEW TECHNOLOGY REPLACES A 12 YEAR OLD BODY SCANNER. IT WAS MUCH EASIER TO USE THIS THAN OUR OLD SCANNER. PICTURES ARE MUCH BETTER BEING ABLE TO FIND THINGS WAS MUCH EASIER WHAT TBEO USED, IS SOMETHING NOW? HEY, THIS IS SOMETHING. OWKN SEOM THINGS HAVE INCLUDED SYRINGES, MARIJUANA PIPES AND OTHER DRUGS AND SINCE SCANRNE WAS INSTALLED BACK ON APRIL 1ST, BNEE HAS RECOVERED 15 DIFFERENT OCCASIONS, AND IT’S NOT JUST DRUGS OR TOBACCO . WE HAVE SOMEONE WHO CAME LAST WEEK, MAYBE THE WEEK BEFORE WHO HAD OVER 80 PILLS. JUST IN THEIR GROIN AREA. PILLS LMDC DIRECTOR JERRY COLLINS SAYS MAY HAVE CAUSED SERIOUS DAMAGE INSIDE THE PRISON. SAYS ”NO COINCIDENCE IN THREE WEEKS OF SCANNING HAS BEEN AN OPERATION. THERE WAS NOT A SINGLE INMATE OVERDOSE. AND WHAT HE SAYS VALUES THE CLEAR PASS. THAT’S 150,000 PRICE TAGS ANYTIME YOU HAVE 150,000 PRICE TAGS ANYTIME YOU FIND THE DRUGS. AND YOU ARE TALKING ABOUT 84 OXYCODONE. YOU KNOW WE CAN’T QUANTIFY THIS BUT THIS IS IT’

New Body Scanner at Louisville Metro Corrections Helps Fight Illegal Drugs and Contraband

Since it was set up earlier this month, officers have seized drugs and contraband 15 times.

Working to combat a growing number of inmate overdoses, the Louisville prison has a new tool they believe can save lives. and meanwhile, the “Clearpass” body scanner provides LMDC personnel with a crystal clear picture of not only who enters the prison, but what. The new technology, which costs around $150,000, replaces a 12-year-old outdated body scanner. What used to be, ‘Is that something?’ is now ‘Hey, this is something,'” Sgt. Tim Dearinger, with LMDC, said. More from Jail: New Metro Corrections Director gives first prison update to Metro Board of Louisville. And those “few things” have included syringes, pipes, marijuana and other drugs. has been recovered 15 times. Those working on the scanner say they are amazed by what it picks up.” We had someone come in last week with over 80 pills in the groin area, we also had a woman with a needle – usually needles, it’s just a thin piece of metal you don’t ‘don’t go see,’ Dearinger said. Jerry Collins, LMDC’s new director, said he was grateful for the technology and the work of his staff. Collins said it’s no coincidence in the three weeks the scanner has been in operation, there hasn’t been a single inmate overdose. What he says makes the “Clearpass” worth the investment. Solving Problems: 2 New Faces, Independent Review of Latest Efforts to Solve Problems at Troubled Louisville Jail “Every time you find drugs and talk about 84 OxyContin pills, we can’t quantify that but that literally saves lives,” Collins said. And as the prison works to get rid of the drugs, they are scanning all incoming mail. LMDC also plans to bring in a pair of drug dogs in time full this summer.

Working to combat a growing number of inmate overdoses, the Louisville prison has a new tool it says can save lives.

A new body scanner now makes it harder for contraband and other illegal drugs to get inside Metro Corrections.

It only takes 3 seconds, and meanwhile, the “Clearpass” body scanner provides LMDC staff with a crystal clear picture of not only who enters the prison, but what. The new technology, which costs around $150,000, replaces an outdated 12-year-old body scanner.

“It was much easier to use this one than our old scanner. Images are much better, much easier to find things. Before it was ‘Is that something?’ Hey, that’s something'”, Sgt. Tim Dearinger, with LMDC, said.

More from jail: New Metro Corrections Director Gives First Jail Update to Louisville Metro Board

And those “somethings” have included syringes, pipes, marijuana and other drugs.

Since the scanner was installed on April 1, contraband has been recovered 15 times. Those who work on the scanner say they are amazed by what it picks up.

“We had someone come in last week with over 80 pills in the groin area, we also had a woman with a needle – usually needles, it’s just a thin piece of metal that you’re not going to see,” Dearinger said.

Jerry Collins, the new director of LMDC, said he was grateful for the technology and the work of his staff. Collins said it’s no coincidence in the three weeks the scanner has been in operation, there hasn’t been a single inmate overdose. According to him, the “Clearpass” is worth the investment.

Problem resolution : 2 New Faces, Independent Review of Latest Efforts to Fix Problems at Troubled Louisville Jail

“Any time you find drugs and talk about 84 OxyContin pills, we can’t quantify it, but it literally saves lives,” Collins said.

And while the prison is scrambling to get rid of the drugs, they’re digitizing all incoming mail. LMDC also plans to bring in a pair of full-time drug dogs this summer.

Share.

About Author

Comments are closed.